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Thanks for signing up and before we go any further....if there's anything I can help you with, please write to me emma@paintingwithpastels.com - I'm pretty quick and replying, although if you live on the other side of the world....I may be asleep when you write, so allow 24 hours.

Below are all the tools that I hope will be of help to you:

If you haven't already got your link from Clickbank - here it is:

http://XXXX.feeosh77.hop.clickbank.net/

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Let's start with getting traffic to your site.

Now you have your link you need to send traffic to this site. There are a few ways you can do this.

MARKETING TIPS

  1. Place the link on your website or blog
  2. Write articles or reviews and submit them to:
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    http://ezinearticles.com 
    http://articlealley.com
    (Remember to keep each article unique.)
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  9. Simply send an email to your friends telling them about it.
  10. Use Web 2.0 sites like Squidoo and Myspace to spread the word.
  11. Create a video review and submit it to Youtube.com.
  12. Don't forget Social Media.

EMAIL 10 DAY COURSE 

Offering a free course on your website will help to promote the Painting with Pastels books. It's a great way of building up a list of followers who will purchase what you are offering. My recommendation is that you add to the Free 10 day course with extra letters sending them at intervals of around one a week. Remember to put in links for them to come back to your site, blog or the sales page.

If you don't already have a mail server then I highly recommend Aweber Email Marketing - you can find them here: http://aweber.com

You can adjust these letters to make them more personal and to your type of website or blog.

LETTER 1

SUBJECT: Welcome to the Painting With Pastels 10 part Mini Course

Dear

Thanks for signing up, and I do hope that you're going to enjoy yourself!

Painting with pastels can be so much fun and very rewarding if you know the right way to go about it.  Believe it or not, you can create awesome paintings.

So What are pastels?  Pastels are sticks, similar to crayons, of colored pigment - the same pigment that's used in paint.

Pastels are used on a surface (such as art paper) that has a somewhat rough or abrasive surface called "tooth", and is therefore capable of taking and holding the pigment.

The most commonly used type of pastels are soft pastels. As the name implies these are soft, with a crumbly consistency, and using them is actually more like painting than drawing.

Harder pastels exist, but they are usually used only for sketching and detail work.

The benefits of using pastels as your artistic medium of choice are many. First of all, they don't require a lot of supplies: all you need is the pastels, paper, and a drawing board.

Second, they're simple: you don't have to prepare your surface before you start working, and you don't need chemicals to clean yourself or your work area when you finish.

Third, they're permanent: pastel sticks last forever, and pastel paintings won't fade over time like paint can.

Fourth, and perhaps most importantly, they bring together the free expression and immediacy of drawing with the rich color depth of painting.

Whether you're a novice artist or you have experience working with another medium, there's a lot to like about pastels.

Yes, they're a little messy - old clothes and a dustsheet are a must - but that's all part of the fun! I'll cover this in a couple of days.

This email series, hopefully, is going to give you a good over-view into working with pastels that will encourage you to, at least, try them - or to pick them up again.  

One of the main things I hear from other artists is that they are hard to use - but it's a mind shift.  Pastels offer a freedom that I, personally, can't seem to get with other mediums.

The best written book that I know of goes into much more detail than I am able to put into this series.  It also has lots of colored illustrations so you can "see" results.

So here's the plug...

Believe it or not, you can create awesome paintings and you can learn more about how to do this right here:

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOP LINK

It is the most complete, easy to follow, resource ANYWHERE on pastel painting.

The "Pastel Painting Secrets" book is the most up-to-date guide available on the internet covering all aspects of pastel art.

This book is about:

  * How pastels are made
  * What are the right tools
  * Correcting mistakes
 
 * The different types of pastels
 
 * Techniques
 
 * Full of helpful photographs

And a whole heap more.

By the way, there's also a couple of other books just in case you want to dive straight in.

"Step by Step With a Pastel Portrait" and

"Step by Step With a Pastel Scene"

Going by the words "Step by Step" I think you've probably guessed that both these books are a follow along with the artist while she uses pastels to do a painting.

Both have well over 100 photos that clearly demonstrate what the artist is doing.  Both are also very easy to read.

Oh, and there are free bonus books as well.

But, if you click the link below you'll be able to find out a lot more about these books:

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOP LINK HERE

End of Plug!

Until tomorrow...

PUT IN YOUR SIGNATURE

LETTER 2

SUBJECT: Things You Need To Start Pastel Painting.

Dear

It's INSERT YOUR NAME here from INSERT YOUR WEBSITE/BLOG or HOPLINK ADDRESS 

Welcome to part 2 of our 10 part Painting With Pastels eCourse, where we teach you the steps to take so you can produce beautiful pastel paintings.

Today we're going to introduce you to the things you are going to need in order to begin.

Surprising enough, you actually don't need a lot of things to get started in pastels. Most important, of course, are the pastels themselves.

All of the big brands of pastel makers sell their pastel sticks in sets as well as individually. While some people advocate buying sticks individually, starting with say 10 sticks and then building up to 30 or 40, there is something to be said for letting the pastel maker do the work of selecting the most useful colors etc. and simply buying a set.

Your first pastel sticks should be soft pastels, specifically a medium-soft grade.

If you are able to, it's a good idea to "try before you buy".  A lot of art supply shops will have a few pastels out for just this reason.  

Although you probably won't be able to try all the colors - you should be able to try different brands for texture to find out which one you like.

In the book "Pastel Painting Secrets", there is a review of several different brands the majority of which the artist has used. I've been told that the information is a big help.

Here's the link:

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOP LINK

Here's a list of colors to consider:

  • Cold Red 
  • Warm Red 
  • Orange 
  • Cold Yellow 
  • Cold Green 
  • Warm Green 
  • Cold Blue 
  • Warm Blue 
  • Cold Violet 
  • Warm Violet 
  • Add to this Black and White 

This will give you a set of 12 colors and you should be able to produce great art with this selected palate.  

Once you have your pastels, the next thing you'll need is a surface to work on, and paper is the obvious choice. (If you are starting out it is great to have some practice paper).

Many different types of art paper are available, including paper specifically made for pastels.

A tip here: Look at water-color paper.

The next thing you'll need is a drawing board. A drawing board is just a rigid surface for you to clip your paper to, which can be then mounted on an easel, or rested on a table or just your knees.

Pastels, paper, and a drawing board: as a basic kit, those are all the tools you need to get started with pastels.

There are other things you will need like tortillons, but there is a complete "shopping list" in each of the "Step by Step" books.

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

As you progress you may want to get a proper easel, and you'll definitely want to consider some tools for blending and for correcting, but there's no reason you can't get these as and when you need them.

As I've said, these are just the basics there's a lot more detail in.....wait for it....the books

PUT IN YOUR HOPLINK 

Tomorrow we'll look at the different types of pastels, so until then

PUT IN YOUR SIGNATURE

P.S. Right now, you can get all the Pastel Painting Books at a great discount plus three bonus books!

So, head on over to

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK

and see what all the fuss is about.  I guarantee you will be glad you did.

LETTER 3

SUBJECT: What Are The Different Pastels?

Dear

Welcome to part 3 of our 10 part Painting With Pastels eCourse.

In this section, we're going to talk about the different types of pastels

'Pastels' usually refers to soft pastels, as these are the type that is most commonly used, the most useful, and the type that give pastel paintings their distinctive look.

However, there are a couple of other types to consider.

First let's consider soft pastels in more detail.

The distinctive characteristic of soft pastels is that they are made mostly of pigment, with little 'binder' (this is the ingredient that holds the stick together) added. This makes them soft and crumbly, and easily able to be smudged and blended after they've been laid down on the paper.

Hard pastels are a little different from soft pastels, as they have a ratio of pigment-to-binder that is slanted more towards the binder. This makes them harder, and consequently better at putting down fine lines on the paper.

It's common to use hard pastels with, rather than instead of, soft pastels. Typically, you'd use your hard pastels for initial sketching and layout work.

You would then switch to your soft pastels to lay in most of the artwork, particularly the big areas of color. Finally, you would switch back to hard pastels for detail work.

Unlike hard pastels, oil pastels are normally used as an alternative rather than an addition to soft pastels. They have a different kind of binder, one that is oil-based, making them soft, buttery and sensitive to heat. They're not powdery like normal pastels, meaning they're less likely to smudge and easier to control.

They can also be used on a wider variety of surfaces than normal pastels. On the other hand, they're not water-soluble, making clean-up more of a chore, and their sensitivity to heat makes them more difficult to handle and requires more care in storing them.

The choice between soft pastels and oil pastels is an individual one, as both have their strengths.

Hard pastels, on the other hand, are a great complement to soft pastels, and most artists using soft pastels will want a set of hard pastels to use alongside them.

So try both soft and oil and see which one you prefer.

The other types that I haven't covered here in detail are:

Pastel Pencils: great for fine detail work

Water Soluble Pastels: a blend of two art forms

Pan Pastels: a completely new twist on pastels

In our next section, we're going to delve how to keep everything

clean which is an important part of using pastels.

Until then

Happy painting

PUT IN YOUR SIGNATURE

 

LETTER 4

SUBJECT: Keep Everything Clean.

Dear

I had a letter from an artist who got a copy of my book and she wrote:

Dear PUT IN YOUR NAME,

I've dabbled a bit with pastels, but since getting the book "Pastel Painting Secrets" I'm now really enjoying using my pastels.  I've learnt so much and it's made painting so much easier now that I know what I'm doing!!

One thing I want to tell you is the amazing chapter on keeping everything clean - it was really what was putting me off pastels, but with all the tips and the "how tos" it's made my painting so much more fun.

Thanks again

Marie Carney
California USA

Did you get the bit about how she was put off pastels because she didn't know how to keep them clean?

I hope this hasn't happened to you. There really are lots of ways to keep it all clean while you're painting.

So here's a plug again... but really there are lots of tips, in fact an entire chapter on keeping it clean in the "Pastel Painting Secrets" Book

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK

For all the great characteristics of working with pastels there is always one downside, and that's messy.

The reason for this is that pastel sticks have a crumbly consistency and loose pigment dust inevitably ends up in a lot of other places: in the air; on your hands and fingers; on your clothes; on parts of your paper you wanted to keep white, and on the floor underneath where you are working.

To keep your surroundings as clean as possible when you work, you should start by putting down a dustsheet underneath your easel.

Then you should deal with the pastel dust coming off your surface.

One option is to use an easel that's tilted slightly towards you at the top, meaning loose dust tends to just drift off the surface.  (You can buy specific pastel easels which have the tilt)

The other option is to put something at the bottom of your drawing board to catch the dust that runs down your paper - a 'V' shaped gutter made of aluminum foil works well here.

Also you'll want to wear old clothes when you work; ones that you don't mind getting pastel on.

These are just a few options, in the Step by Step books you'll actually see what the artist does do, at little or no cost, to keep the surface clean:

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

Until tomorrow

PUT IN YOUR SIGNATURE

LETTER 5

SUBJECT: Surfaces To Paint On.

Dear

Welcome to part 5 of our 10 part Painting With Pastels eCourse.

In this section, we're going to talk about the different surfaces you can use to paint on.

While most pastel artists will use paper as their surface of choice, it's perfectly possible to use pastels on other surfaces, such as archival textured panels or fine sandpaper.

Whatever surface you use, its most important characteristic will be the 'tooth'. Tooth refers to how well a surface holds pigment.

More abrasive surfaces hold more pigment than less abrasive surfaces, which is why sandpaper, while seeming like an odd choice, actually can work well - it has a lot of tooth.

One tip here is that the grittier the tooth, the more pastel you'll use, so if you are using a really soft pastel you will find that you will go through the sticks a lot quicker.

The grittier the texture the less likely I am to use the smudging technique (more because it's not so "finger friendly") and concentrate more with the hatching method.

By the way, if you do go with sandpaper - I prefer the really fine type!!

As far as paper is concerned, you only have to walk into an art supply store or do a search online and you'll find that it's available in a huge variety of tints and sizes.

Size is strictly a personal choice, but tint is something that will affect your work. Usually you'll want to choose a paper tint that's sympathetic to the overall color of the painting you want to make.

The paper color will then serve to compliment and subtly unify your picture.

There is a very good illustration in the book "Pastel Painting Secrets" of how the tint of the paper can change the color of the pastel. It's quite dramatic...

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

In the "Step by Step" books the artist shows you exactly what paper she is using and made sure that it is inexpensive, in fact, the whole idea of these books are for artists, like you, who are really at the beginning of the pastel adventure….so costs are kept to a minimum.

By the way there is a money back guarantee on these books.

And in case you're wondering, the guarantee goes for a full three months. If you're not happy...just let me know and I'll give you ALL of your money back.

And YOU CAN KEEP THE BOOK FOR FREE.

Just thought I'd let you know:

YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK GOES HERE

If you're serious about learning to use pastels these books are worth looking into - there is lots of detailed information - and also stuff you can use with any medium.

Until tomorrow....

YOUR SIGNATURE

P.S. In our next section, we get into the nitty, gritty and explore some of the techniques - no doubt this is the one you've been looking forward to!!

Regards

YOUR SIGNATURE

LETTER 6

SUBJECT: Pastel Painting Techniques

Dear

Welcome to part 6 of our 10 part Painting With Pastels eCourse.

We're over halfway done, and discovered a lot about the basics of painting with pastels.

In this section, we're going to talk about some the main techniques that you can use.

There are three techniques that are very commonly employed in pastels, and which are worth learning...if only so that you can play around with them and come up with your own variations!

Blending simply means rubbing two adjacent areas of color on the surface into one another. It's one of the most commonly used techniques in pastel painting.

Unlike oil and acrylic paint, in pastels the only way to mix colors is to blend them together after they're already on the paper. This mixing is done to create variations of color and tone,and for shading.

Scumbling is the odd name given to the technique of lightly dragging the side of a soft pastel over a layer of pastel of another color that you've already laid down on your surface.

This results in a 'broken' or 'grainy' covering of the new color over the old, and it gives a textural, uncontrolled, 'painterly' effect. This technique has many creative applications.

It could be used to indicate atmospheric haze, to render some long grass in the foreground of a landscape, or to help create a soft complexion (for example a child's face) in a portrait.

Hatching is simply drawing a series of fine, parallel (straight or curved) lines on the surface. In pastels it's best done with a hard pastel stick or a pastel pencil, as these are better at making fine lines than soft pastels.

Hatching is usually used for shading. The thickness and spacing of the lines affect how dark or light that area of your surface appears.

These techniques will start you off and, as said at the beginning, they're just the basics.

Other techniques are:

  • Feathering
  • Pointillism
  • Dusting
  • Glazing
  • Side Stroke

It's probably better to head over to the book Pastel Painting Secrets for a more in-depth look at these as there are also illustrations. It's good to "see" what eachone is supposed to look like!!

In the "Step by Step" books the artist uses the three techniques I've just talked about which really are the basics of pastel painting.

You can grab a copy of one book or all books here:

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK

Tomorrow we're going to look at the importance of value, something that you do need to know about if you want to create stunning art.

Until then,

PUT IN YOUR SIGNATURE

LETTER 7

SUBJECT: Value In Painting And Its Importance.

Dear

Welcome to part 7 of our 10 part Painting With Pastels eCourse.

In this section, we're going to introduce you to the importance of value - a topic so important that there is a whole chapter devoted to it in the book Pastel Painting Secrets.

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE 

In simple terms, value is the lightness or darkness of a color. It's how far removed a color is from its hue (i.e. the purest form of that color).

In art, dark values of a color are called shades, while light values are called tints.

It's not that value is complicated, but it does need more explaining than I can do here in this email.

You'll see that the artist really uses value to its maximum effect in the "Step by Step With a Pastel Portrait" book.

So do yourself a favor and check it out at

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

 

Value is important because when you have a range of values (from light to dark) represented in your paintings, you have contrast, and contrast is crucial because of the importance that it plays in how we perceive things.

Basically, if you want your paintings to appear 'alive', rather than dull and lifeless, you need to include contrasting values.

Value is so important in painting that it's actually a good idea to organize your pastel sticks by value rather than by color, so that you get used to thinking about value first, then color.

By learning more about value you will understand that the value of color is dependent on its surroundings.

There are some great examples of this in the "Pastel Painting Secrets" book at:

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

I know I've done a lot of plugging for these books in this letter, but I can't stress enough the importance of value in any painting and there really are great illustrations of value in them.

Watch out for my next letter tomorrow.

YOUR SIGNATURE

LETTER 8

SUBJECT: The Use of Photos

Dear

Welcome to part 8 of our 10 part Painting With Pastels eCourse.

We've covered a lot so far, and in this section, we're going to cover something that a lot of artists have difficulty with.

Should you use photos or not.

Many painters use photos to assist their artwork. There are essentially two ways of doing this.

The first way is the simplest, and it's just recreating an image from a single photo in a pastel work.

This is useful particularly when you see something (a landscape for example) that you want to paint, but can't at that time. Also, if you start a painting but can't finish it before the light changes, or before your model gets bored, you can take a photo and complete the painting later using the photo.

Note that while the above paragraph refers to taking a single photo, if it's you taking the photos then it's actually much better to take a number of photos rather than just one.

That way you can capture a range of angles and focal lengths, which will help you to make a looser, freer representation of the subject.

The other time when you might try to recreate a photo is when you're using a photo that someone else took.

There's nothing wrong per se with painting the Eiffel Tower from a photo of it, even if you've never been there, though some artists feel that this is inherently artistically limiting and tend to look down on the practice.

You can make up your own mind about this, but keep in mind that recreating photos might be a breach of copyright unless they are explicitly 'copyright free' (you can find copyright free images on the internet).

The second way of using photos to assist your artwork is to use your camera like a sort of sketchbook.

Every time you see something that inspires your creativity, take a photo of it. Over time you'll build up a library of images that you can use as a reference for your art.

You might use different photos to inspire different elements of a single painting.

However you use photos, there's no argument that they're an invaluable tool, and much faster and more convenient than the old sketchbook and pencil!

One last thought, try not to accurately "copy" the photo, youmight just as well blow up the photo and frame it! Instead, tryand put your own personal slant into your painting it will makeall the difference.

The "Step by Step" books have all been painted from photos that the artist took.

These really illustrate how you can take a photo and really create a beautiful painting without being rigidly faithful to the photo.

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

In our next section, we're going to cover how to store your work, so until tomorrow.

YOUR SIGNATURE

LETTER 9 

SUBJECT: Storing Your Pastel Work.

Dear

Welcome to part 9 of our 10 part Painting With Pastels eCourse.

In this section, we're going to talk about storing your work, a dilemma that faces pastel artists.

Pastel paintings are both very durable and very fragile.

On the one hand, pastel pigment doesn't fade or crack over time like paint, so your precious masterpieces will still be just as vibrantly colorful in a few hundred years' time.

On the other hand, because a pastel painting is just pigment dust trapped in the 'tooth' of the surface, vibrations will cause it to shed some dust, and anything dragged across the surface will smear the pigment.

So what can be done about this?

Small numbers of unframed pastel artworks should be stored in stacks interleaved with sheets of glassine paper and foam core board, so that they are protected from rubbing against each other and are supported.

It's important that they are undisturbed as much as possible.

For lasting protection and display, the only real option is to frame your work. Nothing beats seeing your own work up on a wall, and properly framed behind glass it will be protected for life as well.

For best results use a professional framer, though it's certainly possible to frame your own work, and probably something you'll need to learn if you don't want to go broke paying a framer!

If you are framing your work, make sure that you use normal glass and not the non-reflective glass. This glass will actuallydull the painting, whereas normal glass will create a realrichness to the colors.

In Chapter 15 of the book Pastel Painting Secrets book there is a lot more detail about framing - here's the link:

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

In our last section, we're going to go over what we've already discussed, and leave you with some final advice for your pastel painting experience.

YOUR SIGNATURE

LETTER 10

SUBJECT: Number 10 of Painting With Pastels e-course.

Dear

Today we've come to the last part of The Painting With Pastels eCourse. We've covered a lot in the last nine sections, and there's a lot going on.

We've covered what you need in order to begin pastel painting and discovered that you really don't have to have very much at all, just the pastels, a board and some paper. So for a relatively small expense you can be painting today.

In fact if you haven't already been to my books page, then take a look at the Step by Step series - you can choose one and make a start:

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

We've also covered choosing the type of pastel that is best for you.

Is it soft or is it oil pastel?

The only way to find out is to experiment with both.

There are many different techniques, and we've only covered a small selection in this eCourse, however, being a creative artist it won't be hard to play around with these ones and get a variation.

Just remember that you need to understand the important of value in order to create a beautiful painting and hopefully you've been able to understand the basics.

The really best part of pastels is the immediacy of them. Not only do you not have to spend time mixing, but there's no down time drying either.

Unfortunately in these letters I haven't been able to talk about making your own pastels (yes, that's a very viable exercise) nor go into detail about how to frame or taking your pastels out doors or about composition.....

There's still more to learn - and I've barely scratched the surface. So, if you've made your mind up and want to pursue pastels and you want all of the info with great demo pictures then now's the time to take a look at what the Step by Step books or the Pastel Painting Secrets book can offer you go to

PUT IN YOUR CLICKBANK HOPLINK HERE

These are the books I really do recommend, so you can know that you can trust it!

Until next time,

 

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BANNER 4

HTML: replace XXXX with your clickbank ID

<a title=""href="http://XXXX.feeosh77.hop.clickbank.net"target="_new"><img style="WIDTH: 717px; HEIGHT: 95px"title=""border="0"alt=""src="http://paintingwithpastels.com/images/Graphics%2013.jpg"></a>

 

BANNER 5

 

HTML: replace XXXX with your clickbank ID

<a title=""href="http://XXXX.feeosh77.hop.clickbank.net"target="_new"><img title=""border="0"alt=""src="http://paintingwithpastels.com/images/Graphics%2011%20long.jpg"></a>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BANNER 6 (130x130)

HTML: replace XXXX with your clickbank ID

<a title=""href="http://XXXX.feeosh77.hop.clickbank.net"target="_new"><img title=""border="0"alt=""src="http://paintingwithpastels.com/images/Graphics%2010%20130x130.png"></a>

 

 

 

BANNER 7

HTML: replace XXXX with your clickbank ID

<a title=""href="http://XXXX.feeosh77.hop.clickbank.net"target="_new"><img title=""border="0"alt=""src="http://paintingwithpastels.com/images/Graphics%2012.jpg"></a>

 

BANNER 8

HTML: replace XXXX with your clickbank ID

<a title=""href="http://XXXX.feeosh77.hop.clickbank.net"target="_new"><img title=""border="0"alt=""src="http://paintingwithpastels.com/images/Graphics%205.jpg"></a>

 

BANNER 9

HTML: replace XXXX with your clickbank ID

<a title=""href="http://XXXX.feeosh77.hop.clickbank.net"target="_new"><img title=""border="0"alt=""src="http://paintingwithpastels.com/images/Graphics%206.jpg"></a>

 

BANNER 10

HTML: replace XXXX with your clickbank ID

<a title=""href="http://XXXX.feeosh77.hop.clickbank.net"target="_new"><img title=""border="0"alt=""src="http://paintingwithpastels.com/images/Graphics%209.jpg"></a>

 

If there is anything I can help you with especially if you need assistance with banners then please write to me:

emma@paintingwithpastels.com

Thank you for your interest in our Painting with Pastels affiliate program and good luck.

emma

 

Anti-Spam Policy: Painting with Pastels will not tolerate affiliates who promote these products through illegal or unethical techniques, doing so will result in ClickBank terminating your affiliate account, and that you will not be allowed to promote these product if you do so.

 

 

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